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Subject: One Step Beyond Coaching Newsletter - Aug/Sep 2013


One Step Beyond

The Next Level Newsletter
 from One Step Beyond Coaching 

 

Volume X, Issue VIII

Aug/Sep, 2013  

 

cabinet connection


Powerstroke®: Speed through force and form DVD  

The DVD includes more than two hours of video of freestyle technique, drills, and common stroke errors & how to improve your high elbow catch and early vertical forearm.  We include underwater, above water, and freeze frame analysis.

Visit the website to read all about the DVD and purchase your copy today.

 

 

Our sponsored events and teams

One Step Beyond is pleased to be a sponsor of the following races and teams in 2013:

AAA North Carolina Triathlon Series  


Trysports Triathlon Series

FS Series Triathlons

 

Triangle Open Water Mile Swim Series 


Old School Aquathon Series   

NC State Triathlon Club 

 

The FSU Triathlon Club 

 

  

 

 

Dear Marty,


Welcome to Volume X, Issue VIII - August / September 2013!   In this issue we have articles on off-season training and an explanation of stress management. 

 

Powerstroke Freestyle Technique Clinic

hosted by One Step Beyond 

 

  Swim Championship Sunrise

The last Powerstroke technique swim clinic of the 2013 season will be held on Saturday, October 19 at the Triangle Aquatic Center in Cary

12-1PM: Lecture: What is Powerstroke?   

1-130 - Drills demonstration 

130-230: Powerstroke practice 

230-315: Individual swim filming above/under water 

315-415: film review and feedback 

415-500: Lecture: swim training for open water/triathlon

 

You can read all the details and sign up here!  

 

If you can't make it this weekend, our coaches are available for private sessions as well. 

 

 

 

 

Recent OSB Athlete News:

  

Cari Soleo 2nd OA at Pinehurst Intl Tri  

Tori Arens 3rd AG at Pinehurst Intl Tri

Mary Robbins 3rd OA, Kory Gray 4th OA, and Cari Soleo 5th OA in the North Carolina Triathlon Series! 

Brian Mann 5th OA at Belews Lake Sprint Tri
Kari Mayhew 1st AG Finish Strong Aquabike
Anne MacDonald 2nd AG Finish Strong Aquabike
Coach Bri runs 5:26 at the Magnificent Mile
Melissa Alfano PR and 3rd AG at OBX Half-Iron  

Jason Schneider 4th AG at OBX Sprint Tri
Cari Soleo 3rd OA at Wilmington YMCA Tri
Erik Johnson 3rd AG at Wilmington YMCA Tri 

Coach Bri 1st in the Beach Cruiser division at Wilmington YMCA Tri (& fastest run)

Jenni Barker PR and 1st AG at Giant Acorn Intl Tri

Robert Barker PRs at Giant Acorn Intl Tri

Phil Jawny PRs at Ironman Augusta 70.3
Kathryn Leach 1st AG in her first Half-Iron at Carolina Half
Kory Gray 4th OA at Carolina Half
Mary Robbins 9th OA at Carolina Half 

Kristy Borawski first Olympic tri and 3rd AG at OBX Tri
Julie Worden 5th AG at Wilmington YMCA Tri 

Audrey Schipprack, Mary Robbins, and Kory Gray stay tough at Ironman World Championships 70.3 in Las Vegas!
Kari Mayhew 3rd OA at White Lake Olympic
Cari Soleo 1st AG, 7th OA at White Lake Olympic
Joanne Piscitelli 2nd AG at White Lake Olympic
Doug Thompson PRs by 17 minute at White Lake
Cecily Thompson PRs by 5 minutes at White Lake
Tracy Moon 1st AG at CFT Series Sprint #4   

 

And much more, you can keep current with OSB athlete results on our Facebook page

 

Off season training

Daniel Scagnelli, MS, CES, CPT 

 

 

Fall is in the air and football season has started, which is probably signaling the end of your Triathlon season if it hasn't already ended for the year. Time to hit the couch, pack away calories and hibernate after another great racing season, right?  

 

While the "off" season is definitely a great time for rest, recovery and reflection, it is definitely not the time to kick your feet up and back track on all of the fitness gains you made this past season. In fact, it is a great time of year to focus on your limiters while maintaining a solid aerobic base in order to set yourself up for another PR season. So, think twice this year before taking the typical off-season approach to your endurance training.  

 

There are some general principles you can apply to training in the off-season that are definite musts. You absolutely must keep your training fun. Training in the off-season can even be semi-unstructured to the point where you aren't concerned with hitting specific workout targets or making it to masters three times per week. It is important that while you continue to train you must allow yourself the mental break from that ultra-structured training. Once you've tackled your mindset you can focus on some of the more detailed tips that follow to help set yourself up for your best race season yet.

 

Click here to read the entire article.

 

 

 

Coach Daniel holds a masters degree in exercise science, USA Cycling coaching license, is a Clinical Exercise Specialist (CES) through the American College of Sports Medicine, and is a Certified Personal Trainer through the American Council on Exercise   

 

 

Stress management -
even Superman needs sleep

Marty Gaal, CSCS

While life can and should be a joyous celebration, the individual components of our daily commitments do tend to wear us out. Achieving a manageable balance between family, work, and the pursuit of excellence in sports is an important component of becoming "better than before." In other words, understanding how much energy you have to get through your day is a great way to avoid tilting over the edge in any facet of your life.

Each of us have different tolerances to stress regardless of where the stress originates. Our individual tolerances are a result of psychological and physical make up as well as our chronological and athletic ages. 

For example, let's say "Bill" has 100 'stress points' in his stress bank account which he can allocate to his day. Bill has a wife and two children; a full-time job, and is training for a long distance endurance event. Bill also has to deal with the variables of paying the bills, transportation to and from work, getting enough sleep, proper nutrition, and so on. There's a lot going on. 

Bill puts his family first, so he allocates a bunch of his points to them - let's say 35. Bill also has to get to work to help pay the bills - another 35. That leaves 20 points for his training and only 10 points for everything else (his stress point buffer). There's zero left in his stress bank account. 

On a good day, this allocation works and he's able to get to the evening without feeling overwhelmed. But in reality, how many good days do you see in a typical week?  Maybe 2 or 3 if you're in the groove. Every other day, something pops up. Little Billy gets sick and can't go to school. A project at work hits some snags and runs up against a deadline. The bike needs maintenance and you can't ride it without a visit to your local shop. Boom! A stress point deficit emerges. Bill goes negative on his 100 point allocation and starts burning the candle at both ends.

You've all seen the results. Most of us can deal with a little bit of deficit for a couple of days, essentially borrowing points from the future, but after that our stress bank calls in its loan - through physical and mental exhaustion.  We have family strife, drop the ball at work, and/or training sessions go to pot. Eventually we hit a wall and start to shut down, through illness of all kinds. 

Even Superman needed his sanctuary and his sleep.

Rather than go negative on a regular basis, the healthy thing to do is re-allocate your points and deal with your life. No one exists in a vacuum.

So, how many points do you have and which account do you put them in? That's the first step in understanding how to achieve balance and work on becoming a better you.

__________________________________________________ 

Marty Gaal, CSCS, coaches endurance athletes around the globe from OSB Headquarters in Cary, North Carolina.  He currently has 97 points in his stress bank. :)

 

One Step Beyond
Masters Swimming  

Masters logo11

Looking for a solid season of swim training in the Triangle area?  Join the TITANS-OSB Cary Masters swim team at the Triangle Aquatic Center (TAC) in Cary, North Carolina.  All workouts take place at TAC.

This is a year-round program open to all 18+ athletes.

 

Practice times are:
Monday 545-715AM distance & aerobic endurance
Monday 730-845PM distance & aerobic endurance
Tuesday 545-700AM core strength and swim technique 
Wednesday 545-700AM mixed stroke  

Wednesday 730-845PM mixed stroke 
Thursday 600-700AM distance and mid-distance
Friday 545-7AM core strength, swim speedwork


Some Saturdays 700-830AM coaches choice 

The fees:

$52.50 per month for all swim workout times, or $6.50 per session.

TITANS-OSB Masters details.  

 

 

One Step Beyond is an endurance coaching business based in Cary, North Carolina.  OSB is co-owner and primary sponsor of the Triangle Open Water Mile Swim Series and Old School Aquathon Series. To unsubscribe from this newsletter, follow the directions below.

 

 

 

 

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One Step Beyond | PO Box 4622 | Cary | NC | 27519